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  • The Genius of Shakespeare

    The Genius of Shakespeare

    Monday, July 24, 5 - 6:30pm
     
    Dr. Steve Zinkgraf, Ph.D., in cooperation with the EmilyAnn Theatre, looks at how Shakespeare is still influencing us today and look to him for guidance as we think about the importance of words in
    Read More
  • Tall Tale Storyteller - Donna Ingham

    Tall Tale Storyteller - Donna Ingham

    Monday, August 14, 6:30 - 7:30pm
     
    Humorist Donna Ingham is a bred-and-born Texan who gives a Texas twist to the art of storytelling.  Her tall tales are told as only a Texan could - or would.  She has been named The
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  • DocNight:  A Man Named Pearl

    DocNight: A Man Named Pearl

    Tues., Aug.1, 6:45pm
    When Pearl Fryar and his wife sought to buy a house in an all-white neighborhood of Bishopville, SC, they were dissuaded with the explanation that Black people don't keep up their yards.  Remarkably, instead of fueling bitterness
    Read More
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I hope the full-page ad on the back of The New York Times Book Review section on Sunday is creating some buzz.

It certainly caught my attention, as a reader and a librarian.

The ad's main headlines say this: "Who will save our books? Our bookstores? Our libraries?"

A text block ends with this question: "What will happen if there are no more books like these?" Then, there's a list of more than three dozen best-of-all-time English-language books, everything from "The Sun Also Rises" to "The Armies of the Night" to "The Years of Lyndon Johnson."

And the ad winds up with a quote from James Patterson (of all people) that asks whether anyone really cares about the future of libraries, bookstores and books.

Clearly someone cares passionately about the subject. Ads in the Times are not cheap.

But, no one claims ownership of this particular campaign. There is no logo to indicate who paid for the ad.

Maybe it's what's called a "house ad," that is, one that the Times ran on its own without sponsorship.

It doesn't matter. The sentiments are well-stated if over-stated. Quite a number of editorialists and librarians and people in state, local and federal governments care about what happens to books and libraries. And the disappearance of books and libraries doesn't seem imminent.

But, what do I know? I worry more about the future of newspapers, a subject not addressed by the advertiser.

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