• Help with tech

    We can help

    with e-books,

    other issues:

    Noon Sept.23

  • Make a movie and win!

    First Wimberley

    Film Festival

    Entry Rules Set:

    Come Pick Up

  • Little Free Libraries now 'open'

    One at Community

    Center; another at

    Woodcreek City Hall.

  • Banned Books Week

    All week,

    Sept. 21-27

    at the Library

  • Book sale set

    8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Oct. 4 at

    Chapel in the Hills

  • Seeking tax helpers

    AARP tax aid

    helpers needed:

    Call library

  • Learn about ...

    Learn about our

    online classes:

    6 p.m. Sept. 24.

    Sign-up required.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7

Search the Catalog

Librarian Blog

  • Slow it down

    Read slow, learn more and feel more relaxed. That's a formula explored in a Wall Street Journal...

  • A time to study

    We may be entering a golden era for teachers and students. Or that would be the case if I were...

What Did You Do This Summer? (Check all that apply)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
Total Votes:
First Vote:
Last Vote:
Text Size

People around the world have so many ways to communicate these days that governments are having a harder and harder time keeping secrets.

That doesn't mean they won't keep trying to control all that information that wants to be free.

This morning's "New York Times" brings us the not-so-surprising news that South Africa's government is trying to pass tougher laws on communications, making more and more subjects taboo and subject to punishment.

The U.S. government since 9/11 has taken extraordinary steps to shut down various kinds of conversations, and now we have courts and cops that can act completely in secret.

Fortunately, there are folks out there who help us keep track of how free our speech is. Google on Thursday issued its report on government requests to take down information.

Requests by governments to restrict or remove content increased by 26 percent in the last six months of 2012.

"In more places than ever, we've been asked by governments to remove political content that people post on our services," wrote Susan Infantino, Google's legal director, in a blog post. "In this particular time period, we received court orders in several countries to remove blog posts criticizing government officials or their associates."

The powerful around the world just can't stand in the light.

Which is why we must all be vigilant to make sure that government (of the people, by the people and for the people) remains open at all levels and in all ways.

Add comment


Security code
Refresh