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As if we collided in cyberspace, a columnist for the American-Statesman and I got caught up in the same subject in the past few days.

Last week, I started writing a three-part blog on the rising price of college attendance across the country. The columnist got into the same subject this weekend, writing about it from the perspective of a student, not an old coot.

Her point was that college costs have risen X amount, but the rise in costs for administrators has been X++. The rise in what it costs to keep deans and veeps around has far outstripped all other costs.

For today's blog, I wanted to address the rising price-tag associated with those who teach at the university level because professor salaries have also gone up at a quick clip over the last decade, even while the rumblings about lousy pay have grown stronger.

To the latter point, I would say this: I have had the distinct impression that Texas professors have been left behind when it comes to compensation, perhaps because other state employees have, in fact, seen wages stagnate.

That has not been the case with Texas college teachers, according to data posted this year from the American Association of University Professors salary survey report.

At the University of Texas, for example, full professors have seen median pay increase from $99,400 in 2000 to $144,000 in 2012. A cost-of-living calculator at the Department of Labor shows that $99,400 is equal to $134,400 today. So, professor pay has beaten inflation by a good measure.

The situation is the same for associate and assistant professors.

And pay at UT is already way above the national median.

Next time: College book cost in perspective.

 

Comments   

 
0 #1 SSC Result 2014 2014-06-06 16:47
Very good post! We are linking to this particularly great article on our website.
Keep up the great writing.
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