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Misspeaking

Using Google and the internet search are actually not the best ways of checking out the truth of this or that. You probably know that if you've spent much time trying to find verifiable, accurate information on anything other than a health issue, about which there seem to be reams of websites that are equally trustworthy. Everything else just seems fungible. So, it is very nice to have -- in book form for easy reference -- a work that is trustworthy and accessible. I'm thinking here specifically of how often I'm coming up with a quotation to use in something I'm writing or in some story I'm telling. For example, I recently wrote some devotionals for my church and I quoted Edmund Burke as having said, "the only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." I've always heard that Burke said that. Now, thanks to the book I'm referring to above, I learn that Burke did not say that or write that. Someone did, just not Burke. The book is "Hemingway Didn't Say That" by Garson O'Toole. It gets a very favorable review by Fred R. Shapiro in Monday's Wall Street Journal. We don't have the book in our library yet, but I'm certain we will. And it will be well worth looking into when you're tempted to, say, quote John Lennon as having uttered this phrase, which he did not utter: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." Who said that? It's in the book.
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