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Some numbers are up

Carolyn Manning, our library director, has compiled circulation data for 2013. It appears that we have seen a healthy increase in circulation of young adult books. In 2012, a total of 2,462 YA books were circulated. That number rose to 3,070 for 2013. E-books borrowed also increased year over year.

In 2012, 3,232 books were borrowed through Overdrive. That number bounced to 4,951 from 3,232 the year before.

In the youth categories, we saw increases in board books, picture books, junior CD books and kits and puppets.

Overall, though, the number of total items circulated in 2013 was down from 2012 and from 2011.

Part of that decline was in the number of hours patrons logged onto our 15 public-access computers. And another big part was a decline in the number of adult fiction books checked out.

We depend on volunteers

The library has just one full-time employee, and that's our director, Carolyn Manning.

The other eight of us are part-time.

We're open six days a week and at least eight hours each of those days.

It's easy to see that staffing all those hours would be impossible without our volunteers.

We have at least two volunteers every morning and two every afternoon and two on the evenings we are open.

But that's not all. We also have volunteers who handle our inter-library loan program, who catalog our materials and who cover and repair our books and DVDs.

On top of those, there are the many members of the Friends of the Library, who do such tasks as organize an annual book sale.

Today, we are honoring all those volunteers.

THANKS to all of them!

Too many missing

Twice already today I've looked in the catalog and found that an item a patron wanted to check out was listed as on the shelf.

When I looked for these DVDs, though, they were not where they were supposed to be or anywhere else in the library.

This happens far too often. I don't know how often because I haven't kept a record.

I just know that a lot of our materials "walk off" and never return.

Needless to say, this can get expensive fast, with the price of books hitting $25 and more on a regular basis. DVDs aren't cheap, either.

I'm not sure what we can do about this, but it surprises me that in a small community we would have this kind of problem.

Not in the top 10

Texas is not in the Top 10 listing of America's Most Literate Cities.

Library Journal quoted from a report issued last week by the Center for Public Policy & Social Research at Central Connecticut State University and Dr. John W. Miller, university president and author.

The list was based on six key indicators of literacy. They are number of bookstores, educational attainment, Internet resources, library resources, periodical publishing resources and newspaper circulation.

Texas ranks with Arizona and New Mexico in the bottom 25 percent.

Most literate city is Washington, D.C. Seattle is No. 2. Minneapolis is No. 3.

Dr. Miller speculates that it takes a long time to develop a literate population base, and the New England states, which rank highest, have had that kind of time to mature while the states at the bottom of the list are newer.

Might it also have to do with the Hispanic population?

Or might it have something to do with how much the governments in those states value education?

Oops ... never mind

We just discovered some new information about a way for libraries and schools to let people check out and use tablets.

So, we're investigating that before we actually make our Kindle Fires, Nooks and iPad mini tablets available to the public.

For now, disregard earlier blog post, please.