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Not full disclosure

A movement is afoot to try to persuade news media gatekeepers to close the door on information about mass murderers like the kid out in California.

The logic goes like this: Many of these killers are copy cats, so let's not tell them anything they can copy.

Sounds reasonable enough, until you consider the advantages to society as a whole of having a complete story in hand, so as to forestall rumor and gossip and unvarnished, downright lies. If you completely, 100 percent trust law enforcers and others in the criminal justice system (think Dist. Atty. Anderson late of Williamson County, for example) then let them hide all the facts they want.

But, if you're a little bit wary of that, maybe we should not go down that trail.

I sure hate citing that old slippery slope idea, but what's next? Let's get all violent crime out of movies and games, because that kind of thing can inspire copy cats.

OK, I will back off enough to say that I think Margaret Sullivan of The New York Times may have something right when she writes that it might be worth considering to hold off on publshing or otherwise provide a platform for killers with manifestos on a case-by-case basis.

Another way to learn

I love YouTube.

I'm in the Halftime Band at church, and many of the songs we sing I am not familiar with. So, I have to try to get up to speed on them very quickly.

To do so, I go to YouTube, enter the song name, and listen and/or play along. This certainly helps me develop an ear for the music, even if what we finally do with a tune is not exactly what you would find on the video.

Just recently, I bought a ukelele, and, again, I am turning to YouTube for help. I've already learned several songs by watching Ukelenny over and over again.

So, I can vouch for the fact that if you're trying to learn some music, YouTube can be your friend.

Just this week, the library added Mango language instruction to our website. Our hope is that our patrons can go to Mango and, as with YouTube videos, learn another language over time.

This kind of instructional approach certainly can't hurt.

Thanks to 18+

Today was the last day for this year's 18+ young people to come to the library to help us out.

Leslie Williams is in charge of this great program, offered by the Wimberley school system.

Every Tuesday since last fall, Leslie has brought Naomi, Justin, Chance and Sage to the library to shelve books and DVDs and to help clean the place up. Everyone is always in a great mood and wonderful to be around.

Thanks, Leslie and kids!

Impressed ... or not

I read yesterday about a pre-teen girl who asked people to donate money to her local library instead of giving her a birthday present.

Wow, I thought, what a great kid!

But, then I read a little deeper into the story.

And it said she wanted the donations to go to the library in her name so she could get her name on a brass plaque.

Meh.

Lots of toddlers

Our Toddler Time on Monday mornings seems to be a big hit with joms and kids alike.

But, it's not growing like the similar program in the New York City public libraries.

Sage Lazzaro and Esti Jungreis write in The New York Observer that Toddler Times attracted 250,000 participants last year. In the first quarter of this year, the number has already hit 190,000!

Some parents are arriving as much as an hour early to participate.

Sounds as if the libraries need to add some other times for toddlers.

This past Monday, we had about 25 moms, dads and kiddoes. Earlier this month, we had 35.

Those are pretty healthy numbers for a library our size. Thirty-five has us bursting at the seams.