Text Size

Another reason to live here

You may not need more reasons than you already know to live in the Wimberley area.
If you do, though, here's another: A dollar goes farther here than, say, Houston, and certainly farther than it would go in Washington, D.C., or Honolulu, Hawaii.
The Tax Foundation has just crunched some U.S. government data to show where you could buy the least and most for $100.
Turns out that a $100 bill would actually be worth $115 in Mississippi and $114 in Arkansas.
It would be worth only $84.67 in D.C. and $85.62 in Honolulu.
The Texas average value would be $103.52, right in there with Utah and Arizona.
The Austin MSA, which includes Wimberley, has a slightly worse value of $101.

Save up to buy books

The annual Friends of the Library book sale is on Oct. 21 and 22 at the Chapel in the Hills.
The Friends book hoarders have been working like crazy this year to catalog thousands of books donated for the sale. We now have not one, but two, outbuildings on our lot devoted to the housing of book-sale books.
I have no idea how to prove this, but I would wager that we get more used books for our sale than any other town our size in Texas, maybe in the country. Almost not a single day goes by without us taking in some used books to be sold for the library's benefit.
As in the past, Friends only can come to the sale from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 21, and the following day, Oct. 22, the doors are open to everyone from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
All proceeds from this big sale go back into library services and supplies.
So, plan now to attend.
Oh, and you can join the Friends any time between now and the last hour of the preview sale on Oct. 21 by dropping by the library and filling out a blank form.

The secret to handling boys

I see in the Austin newspaper today that some school districts in Texas are heading back to the future again.
Here is the back they are heading toward:
When I was a kid, we had 20 minutes or 30 minutes of recess, full of free-for-all play, in the morning and 20 to 30 minutes gain in the afternoon, and right after finishing lunch we headed outside to play, as well.
We ran off a lot of steam.
Here is why these school districts are going back there:
They have figured out that you can't use enough Ritalin to keep boys from being energetic.
We have gone through about 20 years of drugging boys so they would sit still and pay attention. Ironically, that's roughly the same time period when we jailed so many of them for using and dealing illegal drugs.
Coming full circle, we are now back in the '50s, and recess is back on the agenda.
Who knew?
Well, parents and grandparents of boys, that's who.
And where have they been?

It could BEEEE You

Plans are being finalized for this year's Adult Spelling Bee, which will occur on Oct. 28 at the Community Center.
The Friends of the Library has arranged for a nice lunch for the competitors and guests and cheerleaders, the words are being put into a study guide and the trophies are on order.
Now, all we need is you -- as a speller or a sponsor.
Either way, please come by the library and sign up.
The contest is a fun way to test your skills against other adults in the community and a fun way to help raise funds for the library.
Sponsoring a team is $100, and that includes lunch for three team members.
Come on by!

High tolerance for pain

I'm surprised by the kind of textbook prices college students consider tolerable.
More than 40 years ago I was left speechless when asked to pay $35 for a constitutional law textbook in graduate school. I paid the price, but not without much grumbling and more than a few bologna sandwiches.
Last fall, kids were willing to pay $175 tops for a college text, according to a survey on student spending published last week by infodocket.com based on a bookstore review.
Last spring, the pain threshold number dropped by about $10.
That's still a lot of money.
And that's still a lot of money for traditionally printed texts. Students spent the most on print books, and the least on digital.
I don't get this. We are well into the e-ink age, and yet college professors aren't up to speed?
I'm not buying that.
What am I buying?
I don't know ... but it's not college textbooks at $165 a pop.
DMC Firewall is developed by Dean Marshall Consultancy Ltd