HorizontalLogoFlatKO
Text Size
enes

Butting out

I'm full of excellent advice on, among many other things, how to raise children.
Just ask me.
Go ahead and ask -- because you'll be the only person to have done so in my long tenure as a parent and grandparent. No child of mine or anyone else has ever asked me so much as a question about how to dispose of a dirty diaper, much less how to stop babies from playing all night and sleeping all day. And that's completely in spite of the fact that I do know these things.
Like your children and granchildren, mine know everything. Or they can afford to hire someone not related to me to tell them what to do.
I don't resent all this. Maybe they know that my advice at this stage in my life would be for them to relax and let their kids be kids, for the most part.
That's not a very satisfying answer to a quesion about how to get a kid to get along in kindergarten.
Although, I have learned recently that it is very sound advice, indeed. Alison Gopnik has written a book about letting kids be kids. It's called "The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children." (Whew)
I read a review of the book in Sunday's New York Times.
I would buy the book, but won't.
Why should I? I could get better educated on my philosophy and still nobody would care.
Our website is protected by DMC Firewall!